Douglas A/B-26 Invader

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Hans Dieter Sinanan - Warbird display pilot and flight Instructor



As of 11th of April 2014, Dieter became head of training at The Boultbee Flight Academy at Goodwood.
Years of hard work had finally paid off and his dream of instructing students on "ONLY" classic aircraft was fulfilled.
For more on The Boultbee Flight Academy visit them here http://www.boultbeeflightacademy.co.uk/

 
 

The Boeing/Stearman Model 75 primary trainer is probably the best known bi-plane in aviation history. Commonly referred to as the Stearman PT-17, it was manufactured by the Stearman Aircraft Company in Wichita, Kansas from 1934 through 1945. Boeing publicity claims a total of 10,346 Stearman “Kaydet” trainers built, but this figure includes equivalent spare parts. The actual total of Model 75’s that were completed from the prototype X-75 to the final E75 built in 1945 was 8,428.

In 1938 the Stearman Aircraft Company became the Stearman Aircraft Division of the Boeing Aircraft Company so in actuality, the majority of the airplanes manufactured were designated as Boeings. However, they are still almost universally known as Stearmans.

Generally, all the Stearman airframes built are the same with the only major difference being the engine installed. Original engines included the Lycoming R-680 (225 hp); Continental R-670 (220 hp) and the Jacobs R-755 (225 hp). Post-war modifications include the Lycoming R-680 (300 hp); Pratt & Whitney R-985 (450 hp) and the Jacobs R-775 (275 hp). The propellers generally in use on Stearmans are the Sensenich wooden prop; the ground adjustable McCauley steel blade prop and the fixed pitch Hamilton Standard propeller.

The Stearmans manufactured for the U.S. Army Air Corps were the PT-13; PT-13A; PT-13B; PT-17; PT-18; PT-27 and PT-13D. The U.S. Navy airplanes were the N2S-1;-2;-3;-4 and-5. The primary difference between the Army and Navy airplanes, other than engines installed, was the tail wheel. Army airplanes had a fully steerable tail wheel while the Navy airplanes were equipped with a full swivel type with a lock. Most Stearmans today have subsequently been modified with the steerable tail wheel. The final version of the Stearman was the E75, designated PT-13D/N2S-5. It was the only complete standardization of an Army and Navy production design during WWII and was totally the same for both services.

Post-war civil requirements for surplus military Stearmans is covered by Aircraft Specification A-743. This document lists all the approved equipment allowed on a standard category Stearman and the items that must have been removed, replaced or modified when the military surplus Stearman was first licensed as a civilian airplane. Over the years there have been many models and STC’s for the Stearman Series. The Stearman makes an outstanding and fun civilian aircraft. The owners enjoy fly-ins, airshows, formation flying and a variety of activities.

 
Specifications (PT-17)

Data from United States Military Aircraft since 1909

General characteristics

  • Crew: two, student and instructor
  • Length: 24 ft 9 in (7.54 m)
  • Wingspan: 32 ft 2 in (9.81 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 8 in (3 m)
  • Wing area: 298 sq ft (27.7 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,931 lb (878 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 2,635 lb (1,200 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 Continental R-670-5 seven-cylinder air-cooled radial engine, 220 hp (164 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 135 mph (117 knots, 217 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 96 mph (83 knots, 155 km/h)
  • Service ceiling: 13,200 ft (4,024 m)
  • Climb to 10,000 ft (3,330 m): 17.3 min

 
 
 
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Below, Dieter with Peter Hale, an ex RAF Spitfire pilot with 41 Squadron, who often drops in to Goodwood and loves to be thrown around the skies by Dieter.
Peter is around 92 and is still as sharp as a razor when it comes to talking about his wartime experiences, he's also a lovely man who will talk to you for hours, with log book in hand and literally recall anything you wish to ask him about, down to the day, of his time in the RAF.

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Boeing B75N1 Stearman (B75N)
cn: 75-7854, built in 1944

Some of the other types that Dieter has flown, but not necessary the aircraft shown below

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dr400.jpg

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be76.jpg

be35.jpg

sr22.jpg

tb10.jpg

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g109.jpg

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dh82.jpg

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p18.jpg

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180q.jpg

cap10.jpg

rv6.jpg

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